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Past Issues

GLIDING INTERNATIONAL ISSUE JULY 2017

The July 2017 issue has gone in the mail and should be with subscribers within the first week of July. The Digital version was released on June 30.

  • Jonker’s 18 metre JS3 has been test flown and is the subject of the photo on our front cover.
  • Reports that the ‘Diana’ is back in series production is indeed news. Especially at the prices being quoted. And you can get one early next year.
  • Often wondered how the Germans manage their gliding movement? We provide a report on the German AeroKlub and the responsibilities they are involved in.
  • There is an opportunity for you to personally to make some real cash by getting involved in the European change over to 8.33 kHz transceivers.
  • Not gliding but a feature that will provide a good night’s sleep for the overnight retrieve or that long week-end at the club!
  • A group at the Adelaide University (Australia) have been testing Oratex as a means of re-lifing some older gliders (ASK13 era). Valuable information - worth reading.
  • Ever thought about who manages the German sponsored On-Line-Contest web page and who manages the operation – Reiner Rose is the brains behind this project and we let you have a break down on the numbers involved. Some 116,500 flights were recorded in 2016. The web site attracted 111 million clicks! A surprising operation!
  • A quick read on why aviation GPS is superior to Ground base systems.
  • A report and photos on the Mistral Winds in the South of France. We found few really understand why the winds have been to blame for Vincent Van Gogh (French painter) cutting off his ear. (And it all relates to gliding too).
  • The German aviation journal AeroKurier has admitted that Germany was caught totally unaware of the JS3 development in South Africa. They have gone on to say that Germany has been undergoing identical research on the same problem (Wing to Fuselage inter-reaction) for over 20 years. The Germans will test fly their latest project this northern summer. Exceptionally interesting with a large range of photos.
  • A full report on new soaring instruments that have just hit the market.
  • The American Weather Forecasting system is lagging behind accepted norms for meteorology. But Trump “will fix it!”
  • The fresh look at soaring in Namibia and the flood of Europeans that soar there in Northern winter.
  • And we have a look at the Horten Brothers flying-wing glider of 1933. Still leaves today’s pilots in wonderment!
  • Have you heard about the circular runway. “Going whilst you are coming!” An amusing thought from an adventurous Dutchman.
  • We give competition pilots a look at the 2020 World Championships site at Stendal-Bostel, Germany.
  • Few appreciate the research work being undertaken by Airbus (Batteries, aircraft design, new motivation power). An update.

All this plus another 40 stories to update you on the sport, AND as we have said before - our best issue yet!

We hope you will join us.

JOHN ROAKE

EDITOR.

NEW (or RENEWING) SUBSCRIBERS CAN EASILY EFFECT A SUBSCRIPTION BY GOING TO OUR WEB PAGE - www.glidinginternational.com



GLIDING INTERNATIONAL ISSUE MAY 2017

The May 2017 issue went in the mail on May w3 and should be with subscribers within a week. The Digital version was released on the same day.

Our circulation continues to grow and the May issue breaks new territory with a fresh look at "falling membership". We regretfully have to assume that the International Gliding Commission are interested in accepting that they have the responsibility of addressing the problem and bringing forth a united world wide program to at least "attempt" a fix.

The issue includes:

  • A report on the IGC annual conference.
  • The result of our approach to FAI about not providing value for the money they get from Gliding. Encouraging!
  • Photograph review from the annual gliding exposition at AERO, Friedrichshafen, Germany.
  • World Championships  - New major changes discussed including a review of the complaints about Benalla.
  • The new two seater – Twin Shark – will be a thorn in the existing two seater market.  Looks great!
  • An indepth report on the changes to the World Championship format.
  • The new tow aircraft – Launched a two seater to 2000 ft in 76 seconds.
  • Out-landed German sailplane  pilot held hostage for reward – Not seen again – presumed dead.
  • New possibilities for Gliding with advances in  simulators
  • Aldo Cernezzi evaluates the Lak 17B with  FES.
  • A memorable day flying out  of Minden,  Nevada
  • The history of Tom & Doris's Domain
  • Battery Research -   Looking better by the hour – Great for Gliding
  • Graphene – The new wonder material that will reshape sailplane manufacture in the next decade
  • All this plus 35 other stories that will educate and inform.

As we have said before - our best issue yet!

We hope you will join us.

JOHN ROAKE

EDITOR.

NEW (or RENEWING) SUBSCRIBERS CAN EASILY EFFECT A SUBSCRIPTION BY GOING TO OUR WEB PAGE - www.glidinginternational.com



GLIDING INTERNATIONAL ISSUE MARCH 2017

The March 2017 issue went in the mail on March 1 and should be with subscribers within a week. The Digital version was released on the same day.

Our circulation continues to grow and the March issue breaks new territory with a fresh look at "falling membership", We regretfully have to assume that the International Gliding Commission or (even the FAI) are interested to accepting that they have the responsibility of addressing the problem and bringing forth a united world wide program to at least attempting "a fix."

Fees paid to FAI are not inconsiderable and the advantages are getting less and less. New Zealand has acknowledged that they can no longer afford to send a representative to Europe to the IGC annual meeting and we suspect they are certainly not the only member country in the same position. The sport needs a more switched-on body that is aligned to the whole membership and not just the 2 percent of the membership that are competition orientated. In other words IGC is fast outgrowing its usefulness.

  • Gliding’s Best Kept Secret - The Jonker factory have released the story on just how they went about designing and manufacturing their new JS3. A company with a dedicated goal! They are now a force to be reckoned with.
  • The weather at Benalla for Australia’s World Championships was a major disappointment for the dedicated team that excelled in providing everything except great soaring conditions. We devote 12 pages covering the event with some spectacular photos.
  • Schempp-Hirth’s new Ventus hits the headlines in this issue. And for the first time ever, we have seen a quoted price in public. Unsubstantiated - €100,000.
  • OSTIV had a very successful Congress at Benalla and Gerard Robertson has produced an excellent report. OSTIV is far more membership related than IGC and they should be receiving more support participation from the whole gliding movement.
  • FAI has become a member of the Olympic TV sports organisation .
  • Virtual Reality has arrived and it has a great future for pilot training in the gliding movement (If only it could be organised on a world wide basis). They are a fraction of the cost of a sailplane simulator. A very worth-while project that could make a difference to our gliding population. We have done some electrifying research.
  • Bet you haven’t heard about the gliders that ended up in the US Airforce and were fitted with motors and used as observation aircraft in the Vietnam war. Gliders as war birds ? Yes ! One of our best stories!
  • The medical battle is over in the USA and a number of CAA’s around the world are considering accepting their lead as a concept of some merit. Will your country follow the U.S. move ?
  • Englishman, ÅG Dale, is producing a new series of training manuals. We think they lead the market and are worthy of considering as an aid for your club and your members. After all, G is the most advanced mountain soaring instructor in the world. Read about him in this issue.
  • Veronica is a new name on the Namibian scene. Just completed their first season. A well illustrated project.
  • Our Sebastian Kawa article on soaring in Russia in our last issue has generated some interesting possibilities on sites with considerable soaring possibilities. Russian soaring pilot, Dimetria Ivanischev, has written to us about going to likely locations he personally wants to explore. Anyone with their hands up for a Russian expedition?
  • And we tell you how to handle yourself when you have been “balled-lout” by an air traffic controller for an airspace infringement.
  • All this plus 35 other stories that will educate and inform.

As we have said before - our best issue yet!

We hope you will join us.

JOHN ROAKE

EDITOR.

NEW (or RENEWING) SUBSCRIBERS CAN EASILY EFFECT A SUBSCRIPTION BY GOING TO OUR WEB PAGE - www.glidinginternational.com



GLIDING INTERNATIONAL ISSUE NOVEMBER 2016

The November 2016 issue will go in the mail next week and should be with subscribers by November 1.
We must be doing something right as we are experiencing a big lift in circulation, materially aided by our Digital version. The hundreds that have subscribed to the Digital issue will get their November copy in their email box on November 1. The November issue is another great 64 page all colour issue.

  • It is time gliding had a good hard look at the Olympics and reintroduce our case for participation. This issue traces the history of gliding’s involvement in the Olympics as far back as 1936. It provides readers with a chance to become informed on gliding’s Olympic history. As an aside to this, comes the news from Germany that one of the country’s biggest clubs has lost 20% of their members over the last six months, a state of affairs not restricted to the Germans. Membership decline must be addressed by the IGC and with more than just the cursory lip service they given the problem in the past. Olympic participation must be a move in the right direction. Aldo Cernezzi, our European correspondent flew the Spanish Nationals in the Pyrenees. Thermalling close to Vultures is really ‘something’, especially soaring in this under-rated historical soaring site in Europe. A great place for a gliding holiday.
  • There has been eight fatal gliding accidents in past six weeks. We spend considerable time documenting accidents in most countries with a view to educating the sport on some of its hazards. And we came across the hangar fire that demolished six (6) sailplanes in one go. Read the details!
  • Why is the DG1001 two seat trainer the choice of a number of Airforce training organisations. We have a good look at what DG offers and tell our readers that they are good buy. (USA 19, Indonesia 6, Brazil 10, Australia 11). These upgradable trainers must be a first on any club’s shopping list.
  • Little known is the story about the gliders built in Poland with the aid of concrete in the 1960s. A fascinating story.
  • Sadly, we report the death of Fred Weinholtz in Germany. Known to thousands world wide, this gliding administrator was the first to publish a book on modern soaring. His inexpensive book, “The Theory of Modern Cross Country Gliding”, was translated for and published in English by our editor. Some 30,000 copies (German and English editions) were sold. There are plans afoot to have Fred’s text updated and the seventh edition of the book out next year. Fred and John were lifetime friends. - A Gliding International project!
  • Aldo Cernezzi has flown the first two seat sustainer in series production, the ASG 32Mi from Schleicher. He reports very favourably. (Readers will love our new art work).
  • Electric Self Launchers are getting closer and closer. We keep an eye out on all the new battery technology, the secret to this possibility.
  • We discovered in the last two months that the New York Herald actually sent a reporter to Germany in 1894 to interview Otto Lilienthal. We have published the interview in full (unedited) complete with the Herald’s sketches of what the reporter saw happening in Germany.
  • NASA is putting its money where its mouth is. They are undertaking millions of dollars of research into advanced aviation. We report on six of their projects.
  • Plus 30 other stories that will educate and inform.
This issue is our best issue yet!

We hope you will join us.

JOHN ROAKE

EDITOR.

NEW (or RENEWING) SUBSCRIBERS CAN EASILY EFFECT A SUBSCRIPTION BY GOING TO OUR WEB PAGE - www.glidinginternational.com



GLIDING INTERNATIONAL ISSUE SEPTEMBER 2016

The September 2016 issue is in the mail and should be with subscribers within the next few days. The hundreds that have subscribed to the new Digital issue will get their copy in their email box on September 4. (We have been overwhelmed by the response to the newly announced Digital issue. The Digital subscription is half the price of the airmailed printed issue that continues as normal). See our web page for details. The September issue is another great 64 page all colour issue.

  • How times flies - Jonkers, (South Africa) are enjoying their 10th anniversary and the shipment of their 100th JS1. We have a story on the history of the company and those involved in its development. Fascinating, educational and informative to say the least. A company bound for further successes.
  • Here's a story that we have unearthed. The German Federal Ministry of Economy and Energy sponsored a meeting of German sailplane manufacturers in February with a view to assisting them develop new and advanced manufacturing processes. Making Eur 1.6 million in funds available collectively for research and development, they are obviously mean business. Gliding International with another first!
  • Aldo Cernezzi provides a comprehensive report on his test flight of the Ventus, Aldo is a very competent pilot and journalist and has filed a report that tells subscribers about the many virtues of this new sailplane (and about some features that still need attention). No price publicly announced yet, but the Schempp-Hirth order book is open and that order book has started to fill). Aldo's photos are very impressive.
  • Always active and looking for new stories, we stumbled across a report written in 1901 about the first gliding club formed in the U.S.A in 1894. This is a 'must read' for every American soaring pilot.
  • A report on the dangers of high altitude flying without a pressure suit. Our writer tells us that your blood could boil if you are not aware of the possibilities and dangers – too often overlooked by the club pilot.
  • There were four fatal gliding accidents in June and July. We now research and report on accidents worldwide. This issue contains details of 15 serious accidents recorded since last reporting.
  • Boeing has filed for a new patent. They are planning a new concept in sustained flight (months at a time) that will host communications in lieu of satellites. A highly likely rub-off for the soaring movement.
  • Britain’s exit from the European Common Market opens up the possibilities of lower priced used sailplanes. We provide an in-depth article on the problems and advantages of buying a second-hand sailplane and importing it home (wherever that might be). The article shows not only the advantages but also the problems with importing.
  • Heard of 'Bondic' A new filler product with a patented applicator that will be ideal for minor GRP repairs.
  • A story about fitting twin jets to a 1960 Schweitzer 1-26 sailplane. Could be done to almost any veteran sailplane.
  • The FES has now been fitted to over 80 sailplanes. According to our correspondent, it is the most underrated sustainer system yet to evolve in the last 40 years. Major manufacturers are starting to sit up and acknowledge their existence. Already available for the Ventus.
  • There is now a camera readily available for wing-tip mounting. There isn’t a pilot we know that has not already thought about fixing a camera to his/her winglets. The one we write about is only $US150.00
  • The FAA regulations have now been released for commercial drones. We devote a page to those regs. Surprises us just how many drones glider pilots own.
  • There is now as quick-build kit for a 180 hp two seat tug which has just come on the market. An ideal club project to beat ever-increasing tow charges. This quick-build kit was announced at Oshkosh in July. Full details in our new issue
  • The Third Class medical has been passed by the U.S. Senate and signed into law by President Obama. FAA has one year to effect. Full details in this issue including what concessions will apply to you...
    Question: How many other countries will follow the USA?
  • Plus 30 other stories that will educate and inform.
This issue is our best issue yet!

We hope you will join us.

JOHN ROAKE

EDITOR.

NEW (or RENEWING) SUBSCRIBERS CAN EASILY EFFECT A SUBSCRIPTION BY GOING TO OUR WEB PAGE - www.glidinginternational.com



GLIDING INTERNATIONAL ISSUE JULY 2016

The July issue is in the mail and should be with subscribers within the next few days. The hundreds that have subscribed to the new Digital issue will get their copy in their email box on July 4. (We have been overwhelmed by the response to the newly announced Digital issue. The Digital subscription is half the price of the airmailed printed issue that continues as normal). See our web page for details. The July issue is another great 64 page issue.

  • The July 2016 lead story is on the Schempp-Hirth family, a 12 page treatise on the history of the firm, their founders and their future. Profusely illustrated it is indeed extremely interesting with hither to previously unknown facts. It is a ”must read” for owners of Schempp-Hirth sailplanes.
  • NASA has been spending millions on wing profile research and have announced that they could have found ways and means of reducing drag by 11%. Another must read.
  • Adam Czeladzki, a Polish pilot who became a paraplegic after a sailplane accident decided that somehow he would continue to be a competition pilot. He elected to contact Jonker Sailplanes of South Africa. The imagination of Adam and Jonkers has produced a sailplane with revolutionary flight controls now used in competitions. A fascinating story – well illustrated. Adam now continues to be a winner!
  • Aldo Cernezzi provides a comprehensive report on Aero 2016 at Friedrichshafen., A number of new sailplanes announced and on show.
  • A report on the first drone to hit a commercial airliner. We said it could happen!
  • There were six fatal gliding accidents in May. We are now researching and reporting on accidents worldwide. This issue contains details of 22 accidents recorded in the month of May.
  • Markus Geisen reports from Germany about the restrictions in Europe on the crewing of two-seaters in competitions. Maybe there are the same deterrents in your country. A study of the situation warrants a read of what he has to say.
  • A research paper on the weight of water in clouds. This will leave you spell bound.
  • Do you have air-sickness problems in your club? Fred Robinson tells you how to solve this problem
  • A story by Val Brain tells our older glider pilots that ‘Ageing Does Have Its Compensations.”
  • The Perlan project will soon leave for South America. Did you know that the project to date has spent over $7 million.
  • We talk about a two seat motor glider that costs $1.00 an hour to operate.
  • DLR (The German Aerospace Research Centre) has built an exact replica of Lilienthal’s last glider from the original plans. It has been tested in a special wind tunnel and the results raise an eyebrow or two.
  • We reproduce a photo of a Polish tow plane towing six two seaters line astern.
  • Karol Staryszak, a Polish champion records his thoughts after leaning of the death of a compatriot in a competition they were both competing in. This is the most compelling story we believe we have reproduced in our 10 year history. It should be read by every glider pilot, everywhere.
  • Stemme has changed ownership again and the new owners have updated the S10 with a new version labelled the S12.
  • Plus 30 other stories that will educate and inform.
This issue is our best issue yet! - Yes, we have said it before!

We hope you will join us.

JOHN ROAKE

EDITOR.

NEW (or RENEWING) SUBSCRIBERS CAN EASILY EFFECT A SUBSCRIPTION BY GOING TO OUR WEB PAGE - www.glidinginternational.com



GLIDING INTERNATIONAL ISSUE MAY 2016

The May issue goes in the mail as I write and your copy should be with you next week. Meantime, we are able to announce that our planned Digital Issue starts with this issue on May 10. (The subscription is less than half the hard copy airmailed issue which continues as normal). See our web page for details). The May issue is another great 64 page issue.

  • The May 2016 lead story is on Rieti, Italy’s prime soaring centre and the home of numerous world events. Few are aware that the Rieti airfield was once a swamp, and it was drained by the Romans who left a wonderful legacy. Continuing administration problems beset the site, which will survive regardless of the many arguments that prevail. An extremely interesting story from the pen of Aldo Cernezzi.
  • If you want a considerably less expensive two seat high performance trainer, we have the answer for your club. The Perkoz is almost E40,000 cheaper than its nearest competitor. It is a performer too – Best L/d 41:1. A very informative review.
  • Photo and details of the new winglets that can be fitted to the LS8.
  • Paul Remde provides a review of the very latest in soaring aids. As informative as Paul always is.
  • We report on the 2016 Plenary session of the I.G.C. and we update you on the latest rules and administrative changes and advances.
  • Markus Geisen reports from Germany on their recent expedition to South Africa. They trialled the ‘InReach” tracker and provide a glowing report on its advances over anything yet being used by the gliding fraternity.
  • Schanis Soaring Switzerland has gone upmarket and professional in providing motor-gliding training. Take a Swiss holiday and add some extra qualifications to your log book.
  • A series of photos taken in 1931 showing the building of the Grunau Baby in Silesia, a former province of Germany.
  • An in-depth review of the team in the Perlan project showing the problems that would be associated with a bailout at 90,000 feet. Frightening!
  • Thinking of buying a used sailplane? You need to read how to avoid the traps that could prevail with any such purchase.
  • The world wave flying master from Omarama, Gavin Wills, teaches you how to ‘Catch Waves’ and get established more easily. This feature article is a a ‘text book’ on the subject.
  • A test report on the new ASG 29Es by a German professional. Translated from a German article. He also describes the new motor control system perfected by the manufacturers.
  • Bet your club has one of these. A 1981 story about a REAL PILOT. A humourous article about the club show-off.
  • Plus 30 other stories that will educate and inform.
As we have said before, this issue is our best issue yet!

We hope you will join us.

JOHN ROAKE

EDITOR.

NEW (or RENEWING) SUBSCRIBERS CAN EASILY EFFECT A SUBSCRIPTION BY GOING TO OUR WEB PAGE - www.glidinginternational.com



GLIDING INTERNATIONAL ISSUE MARCH 2016

The March issue goes in the mail as I write and your copy should be with you within the next week. Meantime, we are able to announce that our planned Digital Issue will start with the May 2016 issue and the subscription is a fraction of the hard copy airmailed issue which continues as normal. (See our web page for details). The March issue is another great 64 page issue.

  • The March 2016 cover features the new Ventus. It has successfully completed its first test flight. Price has not yet been announced. As Bernd Weber, C.O. at Schempp-Hirth tells us "the first flight was entirely flawless” and the sailplane is a Ventus (Not a Ventus three - just - Ventus). Bernd says the Ventus flies better than expectations and they are very proud of the end result!"
  • The feature story (by one of our special writers – Aldo Cernezzi) is about his visit to the HpH factory. Take it from us, HpH is no cottage industry and you are going to be amazed at the line-up of available sailplanes and the world spread of their deliveries. A really great story with exceptional art work and photos. (Their long awaited two seater will fly in December – the price and performance for this sailplane is going “to rock” the sport.)
  • Elke Fuglsang-Petersen again excels, revealing the exceptional performance of an American Pilot, Ramy Yanetz. His flights over the Western side of the USA were amazing, likewise his photography. You will really enjoy this article.
  • The long awaited official accident report on the ASH25 EB28 in Namibia in November 2014 has finally been released. The two-seater broke up in mid-air, but there is an underlying cause for this - one you would not suspect. The report is reprinted in full – just as released.
  • It has taken IGC over 12 months to complete an in-depth analysis of vital world soaring statistics. This report is illuminating. It shows a concerning picture - especially when you compare it with the statistics of 10 years ago. Another first for Gliding International.
  • Bet you didn’t realise that there were seven brothers and sisters in the Wright family. Tom Knauff has put pen to paper to write about them. We also publish a story on Percy Sinclair Pilcher. He could have beat the Wright Brothers into the air by several years.
  • Mid-air collisions continue to be a source of serious accidents. Do you ever think about the possibilities? Read up on this story.
  • We found a story originally written in 1968 about soaring on the West Coast of USA (Oroville) involving the genius Cloyd Artman. . The illustrating art work also drawn in 1968 is exceptional. The story has a human touch, humour and facts and certainly worthy of the space it occupies in this issue.
  • We publish a fantastic picture of a sailplane soaring against the skyscrapers of Dubai. A first!
  • Dr Rick Agnew (an Australian) visits Argentina and Patagonia almost every year. He puts you in the picture about what you can expect, how to get there and where you should base your trip. He supports his story with the most remarkable wave pictures you have yet seen. This story takes pride of place in the March issue.
  • Plus 36 other stories that will educate and inform.
As we have said before, our best issue yet!

We hope you will join us.

JOHN ROAKE

EDITOR.

NEW (or RENEWING) SUBSCRIBERS CAN EASILY EFFECT A SUBSCRIPTION BY GOING TO OUR WEB PAGE - www.glidinginternational.com



GLIDING INTERNATIONAL ISSUE JANUARY 2016

Because of Christmas, the January issue is already with the printer and will be mailed towards the end of the week. We specialize on two particular topics. There is a 12 page review of Schleicher’s ASG32 which is very illuminating, whilst we find a club (the only one in the world) to increase their membership by 70 percent and double their income from their sailplane fleet.
Another great 64 page issue.

  • Elke Fuglsang-Petersen writes about the German Aero Club and how they manage gliding clubs and soaring in Germany. Lessons here for all to learn from.
  • The all new ‘Glowfly’ self launch ultra-light motor glider will be test flown within the month. A detailed report from the manufacturers on this totally new concept sailplane is to have a price lower than anyone would ever have thought possible.
  • The FES nose mounted electric sustainer is now literally taking off. Schempp-Hirth are now offering the add-on for the Discus. The Fes factory report that over 50 sailplanes are now flying every day with a FES nose mounted sustainer.
  • You can now buy a heads-up-display for your sailplane for as low as $259. Gliding International challenges gilder instrument manufacturers to make their products compatible. This ‘heads in the cockpit’ eliminator should be compulsory for all sailplanes writes Joseph Carr, the new writer to our competent team at Gliding International.
  • Thomas Reisner writes about vertebrae damage easily sustained in a heavy sailplane landing. He writes about the essentials owners and pilots should be undertaking without question. Do you have the correct crash resistance cushions in your sailplane ?
  • Myles Hynde suggests what you should do about fitting winglets to earlier sailplanes that were manufactured without them.
  • We provide details on the biggest ever sailplane order. A contract has been let for 194 motor gliders to an Indian buyer with delivery spread over three years. This intriguing order is detailed in our January issue.
  • Did you know there is vibrant gliding activity in Indonesia. Hidden away near Jakarta is the sole Indonesian club which is particularly active. They invite any in the area to join them ( Live-in accommodation available) Details in this issue.
  • Good enough Just isn’t - A story for tow pilots to absorb and learn from. Minimum standards are unacceptable. A shake up for tow pilots.
  • Compressed air forced over a wing surface has the ability to positively increase sailplane performance when a pilot most needs it. German research (detailed in this issue) reveals the next major improvement to sailplane performance.
  • The promoters of the elimination of the third class medical in U.S.A. are having success. Likely to set a precedent for other countries to follow they have another milestone under their belt. Certainly looks like they will win their cause. Tow pilots may never have to have another medical. Details of the legislation changes in this issue.
  • Ten hours talk time from a five minute charge. This is the achievement from new battery research. Battery capacity improvements are flying onto our scene with frequent regularity.
  • Details on a complete replica collection of Wright Brother’s aircraft on sale, plus a report on NASA’s X-Plane $15 m three year project.
  • Additionally we bring readers details on major carbon–fibre changes to aircraft manufacturing.
  • Plus 35 other stories that will educate and inform.
As we have said before, our best issue yet!

We hope you will join us.

JOHN ROAKE

EDITOR.

NEW (or RENEWING) SUBSCRIBERS CAN EASILY EFFECT A SUBSCRIPTION BY GOING TO OUR WEB PAGE - www.glidinginternational.com



GLIDING INTERNATIONAL ISSUE NOVEMBER 2015

The November issue of Gliding International will be mailed before week’s end. It specialises in reports from Germany, but has a wide range of exceptional stories and photographs including:

  • Elke Fuglsang-Petersen writes about the German method of pilot retention that involves a week long flying course where students each have a mentor whose sole purpose is to foster and teach the student how to get involved and conquer cross country soaring fears. The mentor flies his own sailplane, the student flies his own sailplane. This is the best retention – ab initio scheme we have yet seen. Learn more!
  • Many German two seat owners unhappy about the selection procedures for entrants to the German Nationals and World Championship selection.
  • Aldo Cernezzi flies and reports on the axe being taken to the Diana II to create a brilliant 13.5 metre sailplane. A fascinating story. The photos are really great! The re-modeled Diana II wins the World Championships which shows what a little imagination can do to a new class. The Italian Silent factory is on to a winner. With a FEZ in the nose, this less expensive motor-glider has the possibilities of becoming a major class.
  • Ritz writes about the FAI annual conference in Rotterdam, and we list all the awards made to pilots world-wide.
  • Paul Remde writes about the latest in instruments. Latest variometers can now show a graphic on the shape, size, strength and position of a thermal. This is probably the best aid to soaring produced in the last 10 years. Get the details in this issue.
  • A full report on the Vintage glider club rally in Terlet, Holland.
  • Is there being too much emphasis being placed on the dangers of drones? A new look at the situation which places less likelihood of a mid-air than previously thought possible.
  • The Perlan project is now airborne. They are on track to shift to Argentina and attempt that elusive 90,000 feet goal. More details in this issue.
  • How about being able to drop off your worst day in any competition calculation. A review on the subject that has been simmering in the back- ground for 20 or more years.
  • Propellers on your wing tips. Another idea for a motor glider emerges from the U.S.A.
  • Sebastian Kawa finishes third in the finals of the Grand Prix. Let’s hope he not losing form.
  • Finally, a story that has taken five months to prepare. A survey of pilot ages world wide. The results are worse than anyone ever imagined. Did you know for example that 1.73% of the world pilot population is aged over 80. There are just as revealing other statistics. Bet you couldn’t guess the percentage of pilots over 65 either.
  • Plus 35 other stories that will educate and inform.
As we have said before, our best issue yet!

We hope you will join us.

JOHN ROAKE

EDITOR.

NEW (or RENEWING) SUBSCRIBERS CAN EASILY EFFECT A SUBSCRIPTION BY GOING TO OUR WEB PAGE - www.glidinginternational.com



GLIDING INTERNATIONAL ISSUE SEPTEMBER 2015

Your copy of Gliding International will be mailed this week. This is our ninth anniversary issue and our team declare it to be the best we have yet produced. It has a wide range of exceptional stories and photographs including :

  • Are you an ‘also ran’ at every gliding championship you enter. Do you ask yourself ‘Why do I never win a championship?’ Well we provide the most comprehensive review on how to win. The review comes from the world best sailplane competition pilots and gives you a totally new appreciation what you have to do to be a winner. We regard this article as the best we have every printed.
  • Bill Walker’s life is reviewed. An exceptional man who died in an accident in Namibia late last year. A personal friend of the editor who writes about the extraordinary life in gliding of this prominent New Zealander and the progress he made in creating his own unique competition sailplane.
  • Aldo Cernezzi flies and reports on the Sunseeker Duo. This motor glider is ‘something else’ and a major breakthrough using the exclusive use of the sun as a means of making the craft a self-launcher. A fascinating story. The photos are spell-binding.
  • Research by NASA has produced a totally new way of producing moulded carbon fibre structures which opens up a new concept of producing sailplanes. A big bonus for the first manufacturer to adopt the NASA process. This is a story that will leave subscribers spell-bound.
  • A story on a five bladed propeller for a Pawnee and other tugs.
  • A comparison of wings. The new Ventus versus the wings of a Conder. Remarkable similarities.
  • A trip back to 1929 and the Black and White days of gliding. Instant launches aided by mutton fat. You have to admire our pioneers!
  • Do you know that the world has lost 210,000 pilots since 1980. Where have they all gone in 35 years?
  • For new soaring pilots - What’s so great about 27 degrees (angle of bank in a thermal). Get some thoughts/help in improving your thermalling.
  • Another new weather forecasting aid. The world viewed from one million miles away. A photo to support the concept.
  • Live crash testing of Emergency Locator Beacons. NASA buys old aircraft to provide real-time crash evaluations.
  • Elke Fuglsang-Petersen writes about flying the Sierra wave with Perlan’s Chief Pilot, Jim Payne as well as a report of the Women Soaring Pilots Association annual conference in Minden, Nevada.
  • Ritz writes about the European 2015 Championships now mid-way through the season.
  • And we ask the question: ‘Is the E-Genius a Winner’.
  • And they are developing an unmanned glider to soar on Mars. Radical design!
  • We provide a graphic chart on glider parts in five languages. A chart worth keeping – will come in handy one day.
  • The talk is all about 2.6 million drones sold annually by year 2025. This is frightening as control will virtually be uncontrollable.
  • Plus 35 other stories that will educate and inform.
As we said our best issue yet!

Plus 35 other stories that will educate and inform.

We hope you will join us.

JOHN ROAKE

EDITOR.

NEW (or RENEWING) SUBSCRIBERS CAN EASILY EFFECT A SUBSCRIPTION BY GOING TO OUR WEB PAGE - www.glidinginternational.com



GLIDING INTERNATIONAL ISSUE JULY 2015

Your copy of Gliding International will be in your mail box next week. This issue has a wide range of exceptional stories and photographs including:

  • An appraisal of what a well configured simulator can do to your club. (Not just a desk top computer type operation either). Apart from being a financial generator, it can sustain and add to membership and create a whole new club atmosphere. A desirable situation. Aldo Cernezzi, our in house, sailplane evaluator reports on the sophisticated operation now running at the Milan (Italy) club. This article should be read by every club committee member!
  • Elke Fugslang-Petersen spent two days at the Aero 15, Friedrichshafen, Germany, spying out the next new models and reporting on what the sport can expect in the next 12 months. She is a good journalists and an exceptional reporter with a keen eye for detail. Worth reading by every soaring pilot.
  • New African soaring centre - this one is in a modern civilised town -where the comforts of home welcome the soaring pilot to the soaring scene of a life-time. Its called Kuruman and is on the Sth African/Botswana border. It promises to be cheaper than any other African soaring centre and our German reporter, Markus Geisen gives it the thumbs up. Hs writes well (about the 500 klm he did without planning one afternoon. Southern Africa, Namibia and now Kuruman are sites to be explored, but we recommend Kuruman for the soaring holiday of a life time.
  • The Horton Brother made their fame in designing flying wings (aircraft with no fuselage) and actually designed a glider that flew in the 1940s in Germany. They made four flying sailplanes but none survives to this day. There is one non flying replica in a German Aero museum. Well one has been under construction for 15 years and nearing completion. Was displayed at Aero 15 this year. The story behind the story is told in this issue.
  • The German Aero Research organisation DLR has found a simple way to repair glass fibre and have built a small machine that makes repairs a breeze. The unit on display in this news item for all to see.
  • The story on the Soaring Condor is a nature study of interest to soaring pilots. Down to less than six breeding pairs 10 years ago they have been nursed back to survival. The Condor has the biggest wing area of any soaring bird and have the original flying wing with winglets. A fascinating story.
  • This issue we take you into the 80 year old Winter Instrument factory in Germany. A surprisingly complex organisation essential to the success of gliding.
  • The DLR wing profile changing program that has been under development has proved to be eminently successful. Has profound possibilities for gliding and its future. A follow on story from the original that appeared in the previous issue.
  • The United Kingdom to appoint an aviation ombudsman. This item will lead the way for similar appointments elsewhere and a welcome overseer to prevent hasty CAA hassles. Will your country follow up on this appointment?
  • Blanik has come out with a new sailplane that has lots and lots of improvements. (Has a 6000 hour wing life). More in this issue with photos.
  • Introducing a new book – ‘Dancing with the Wind” devoted to wave flying, its problems, dangers and adversities. This 304 page text book on waves should be in everyone’s library. Book now available. Printed in France in excellent English.
  • An answer has been found to bugs sticking to wings. (At last) Will make bug wipers an unnecessary (costly adjunct) to wing design.
  • The likely start to a war on white painted sailplanes. A group advocating colour – any colour but white.

Plus 35 other stories that will educate and inform.

We hope you will join us.

JOHN ROAKE

EDITOR.

NEW (or RENEWING) SUBSCRIBERS CAN EASILY EFFECT A SUBSCRIPTION BY GOING TO OUR WEB PAGE - www.glidinginternational.com



GLIDING INTERNATIONAL ISSUE MAY 2015

Expect your copy of the magazine in your mail box next week. This issue has a wide range of exceptional stories and photographs including:

  • Finally, Schempp-Hirth has announced their answer to the 18 metre sailplane debate. Unveiled at ’Aero 2015’ at Friedrichshafen, the Ventus III is something truly to behold and if it flies as well as it looks, the opposition has something to be wary of. We are the first to produce photos of the Ventus III with an accompanying press release from manufacturers.
  • An official report on the German expedition to Everest and beyond headed by Klaus Ohlmann. Some exceptional photographs. Not the every day gliding scene. What they did was quite frightening.
  • The co-pilot of Germanwings flight 9525 had a long association with the Westerwald Gliding Club in Germany. A review of his past gliding history and a number of facts on Andreas Lubitz not previously made public.
  • Have you heard of the GloW sailplane. A factory has been sent up in the United Kingdom to produce this sailplane with an entirely new self launch feature - there is nothing like it! They are guaranteeing to be the least expensive new sailplane on today’s market. The first production models will appear in September. Full coverage of the history and future (with photos and graphics) on this project.
  • Englishman Mike Till is an inspirational gliding instructor who follows the sun instructing at Omarama in the English winter and in England’s London Gliding Club at Dunstable in the New Zealand winter. With 12,000 hours in sailplanes and almost the same in tow-aircraft, this ‘gentleman’ has had an amazing career that will keep readers enthralled with his history. A report from Rod Dew, famous pilot and writer on gliding affairs.
  • Aldo Cernezzi, our in house, sailplane evaluator, flies and reports on the Stemme S6. If motor gliding interests you, you will enjoy Aldo’s always frank report.
  • Steve Noys comes across a pre-war designed two seater trainer used by the U.S. Airforce in 1942. He takes on the mammoth task of restoring it to flying status. Well illustrated!
  • A major break through in radio technology. The Pizzicato Project uses less than 10% of current production parts in producing a communication transceiver. Expect transceiver products to dramatically become cheaper in the near future. Cambridge Consultants (England) are confident they have discovered major new circuitry for our every day radio products.
  • A review of the ‘Round the World Courtesy of the Sun’ project. Until now few have appreciated the size of this powered glider. Detailed graphics.
  • To our pilots who always carry a camera with them, you will be extremely interested in the new ‘stick on camera to any surface’ activated by a cell phone. This is a new product for those who love taking 'selfies' Cost $79.
  • We devote a page to the U.S, Pilots Bill of Right Part II. The ramifications of this project will have world-wide effects for every soaring pilot.
  • The Wright Brother were not first. Heard of Cayley? Well he was a hundred years ahead of the Wright boys and he proved it. Recent discovery of Cayley graphics of 1792 will have you thinking. A remarkable story for gliding historians and others with just a mere interest in the sport.
  • At last we can let subscribers know about the program under way at the University of Texas in Dallas. Learning about the whereabouts of active thermals whilst flying is now a possibility. A big funded research program is under way. See this current issue.
  • The U.S. FAA have finally released the rules that will apply to the aerial use of drones. A must read for active soaring pilots.
  • The Australian Airforce have applied flight restrictions on the ASK21 Mis.
    There needs to be a fix for the self launch Solo motor.
  • Major accidents world wide since our last issue: no sailplanes involved in mid airs but two bail outs. All detailed in this issue.

Plus 35 other stories that will educate and inform.

We hope you will join us.

JOHN ROAKE

EDITOR.


GLIDING INTERNATIONAL ISSUE MARCH 2015

Expect your copy of the magazine in your mail box soon – It was mailed on February 23. The usual mix of great stories including:

  • Shattering News - For the past two years, technically skilled glider pilots have started to use traffic awareness data messages, sent by “anti-collision” devices, as received by ground stations i.e. Flarm Their success encouraged a group of the developers to take their program to an even higher level by relaying the decrypted position data over the Internet and over lay the information onto a map of the world. You can already start to view where the majority of gliders are flying at any time - word wide – all recognizable even at the concept’s early stages of development. You will be able soon be able to even listen to the radio chat, live. A special first for Gliding International from gliding sports writer, Aldo Cernezzi.
  • Elke Fuglsang-Petersen takes readers behind the scenes and explains the mysteries of the German Akafliegs, how they operate, what they are producing and how the youth of Germany are involved in the day to day operation of the various independent separate Akafliegs. A first time indepth report on these aggressive sailplane developers. Learn a bout their new side by side two seater that has just been test flown.
  • David Jansen flew a remarkable cross country in Australia in January. The longest ever flight in Australia of 1582 klm over three states. Well written and extremely well illustrated, it is a ‘must read’ for any ambitious cross country pilot.
  • Antares are on the track of a new concept for motor gliders. Has interesting possibilities.
  • We have an extensive new report on new instrumentation currently available. Something new for everyone
  • This issue’s centre-spread photo features a great soaring day at Australia’s Tocumwal.
  • Still the subject of much debate, ADS-B has development problems in the U.S.A. where they have spent $US6.5 Billion on it todate. Yet it is not anywhere near completion. Other countries are expected to have equal problems. An interest topic that will have ramifications for gliding everywhere.
  • One of the greatest towing stories to ever emerge from gliding’s archives. Do you fancy an ‘Upmarket Tow Plane’ like a Spitfire from World War II. A fascinating story that has surfaced from archives 72 years old.
  • Building your own ADS-B Ground Station in not an onerous proposition. Details on the subject in this issue.
  • Do you have time warranty on the motor in your motor-glider. Many don’t to their regret. The subject of manufacturers un-supported motors is proving to be a nightmare for owners seeking replacement parts. We examine this problem leaving the reader with some concern about the future of their self launching/sustainer sailplane. A timely warning.
  • Big money is available for pilots willing to take up drone operating. Some are getting up to$225,000 US a year. Want a slice of that? Read this issue. Likewise Capital Airlines, China are now seeking qualified airline pilots paying $290,000 p.a. for working four weeks on, four weeks off.
  • Aviation fuel has dropped dramatically. Has your club lowered their tow charges. If not – why not?

All this and 60 more news items from Gliding’s International scene.

We hope you will join us.

JOHN ROAKE

EDITOR.

NEW (or RENEWING) SUBSCRIBERS CAN EASILY EFFECT A SUBSCRIPTION BY GOING TO OUR WEB PAGE - www.glidinginternational.com



GLIDING INTERNATIONAL ISSUE JANUARY 2015

Although we mailed the January issue on December 19, we would not expect most world readers to get their copy before Christmas. Nevertheless it is worth waiting for.

  1. The lead story is about the fabulous find of a whole new Gliding Site in Utah USA called Nephi. It has everything you could want in a gliding site – read the full story and possibly go and enjoy the facilities.
  2. Aldo Cernezzi our sailplane specialist and evaluator writes about Binders EB28. This 60:1 plus sailplane with the latest models now having 30m wing spans is something to behold. Photographs that are simply breathtaking.
  3. You have never seen a photo of a sailplane grid with 131 gliders before. Positioned with great care, the photo is spell-binding. Taken at the 31st Worlds in Poland, 2014.
  4. A story about the ‘WK” aircraft that combines into a power aircraft tug and a high performance 18 metre sailplane. A unique concept that is seeking investors to hold their hand up and help get the project into the air.
  5. Our first ever story about gliding in Ireland. Our pilot writes about his flight from Dublin to Ulster (Northern Ireland) and back. Fascinating!
  6. Centre spread is a photo of two sailplanes preparing to land at Rieti, Italy. Great viewing and previously unpublished.
  7. An in-depth story with supporting photographs of the new air-traffic control tower system being manned via scene capturing cameras. The tower of the future, America is looking seriously at establishing a net work.
  8. Tell your 70 year friend it is not too late to start to learn gliding. An evaluation of the opportunities available to those in the latter span of life.
  9. Story about an electric mobility cycle that folds sufficiently small enough to fit in the locker of your sailplane. Makes you mobile wherever you land out.
  10. The Germans have developed a paint that when applied acts like on giant solar cell. Has a future for sailplanes.
  11. Learning to use the radio has become a limiting hazard for new trainees. In this issue an article that will help the novice overcome the necessity of “learning the new language” involved in radio communication.
  12. Learning to cloud fly will definitely improve your thermalling technique and make you a more precise thermalling pilot and increase your cross country speeds.
    A review on whether you should learn to cloud fly.
  13. Germany is spending 82.4 million Euros on a new aviation research centre involving 14 major aviation organisations. Gliding is part of the development of this major concept that will open in December 2015. A great story.
  14. The first sustainer jet unit has been has officially been rated and approved by Germany’s EASA. Complete details in this issue.
  15. There is talk amongst designers that smaller rudders with induced air flows can lead to greater sailplane performance. NASA is involved in researching this concept.
  16. Battery recharging can now be achieved from wing flexing. Has all the signs of likely advantages for your sailplane. A small unit that that can be retro fitted.
  17. Lange (Germany) has just been involved in another court case over year’s delay in production and not being able to refund deposits.
  18. Jonker JS1’s now available ex a factory in Germany and being EASA rated.
  19. The world’s leading 20 sailplane pilots is now headed by a Polish pilot. The list shows them in order as at December 20.
  20. The first ever plastic sailplane (made in 1958 ) rescued from the scrap heap and being restored.

All this and 60 more news items from Gliding’s International scene.

We hope you will join us.

JOHN ROAKE

EDITOR.

NEW (or RENEWING) SUBSCRIBERS CAN EASILY EFFECT A SUBSCRIPTION BY GOING TO OUR WEB PAGE - www.glidinginternational.com



GLIDING INTERNATIONAL ISSUE NOVEMBER 2014

Expect your copy of the magazine in your mail box late next week. The usual mix of great stories including:

  • The most horrific story yet – Our reader ordered a new sailplane and remitted €100,000. After four years, there was no sign of the sailplane (from a major manufacturer) nor his money, so he began the long process of getting his money back via the German courts who threatened the manufacturer with bankruptcy. After five years, he got his refund plus expenses, but herein lies a warning for potential buyers. The full story in detail.
  • The authorative soaring journalist, Elk Fuglasang-Petersen (Germany) writes about the O.L.C. (On-Line Contest) in detail. A complete review of the 2014 scene which ended mid-September. The statistics are absorbing.
  • Imagine - 23 billion Euros is to be spent on the Americans G.P.S. constellation for no financial rewards. Gliding correspondent extraordinaire, Rod Dew, has researched the project which is not only exceptionally well written and illustrated, but extremely interesting and educational. Worth reading!
  • Two exceptional photos of what has happened in our playground (the sky above) during September.
  • A report on stage two of the Pilot’s Bill of Rights, about to be voted on in the US Senate.
  • A report on from the University of Southern Denmark about research on an alternate method of storing pilot oxygen. This is fascinating - tests proving ‘re-useable oxygen’ is a distinct possibility.
  • Another possible use for a tow-plane (tongue in cheek). Air skiing on a surf board is something inventor, Aaron Wypyszynski, of Meridianville, Alabama deems to be possible. He calls it a ‘wing-board’.
  • An Omarama pilot spends two weeks in the French Alps and flies almost every day. A well written report on the soaring possibilities in France and the unique location he chose to fly with the ‘Buzzards’ of that country. Supported by excellent photographs. The centre spread displays spectacular ‘Coral of the Skies’.
  • Twenty two year old Luca Bertossio is a World Champion sailplane aerobatic pilot as well as being an airline pilot (in his spare tim). He details his training methods, diet, and living habits during training for world events. An entertaining interview.
  • A Guinness Book record flight from 96,000 feet. A model glider flies 132 klms after being released from a Balloon in an interesting US Airforce Academy experiment.
  • We report on the history of gliding highest award, the Lilienthal Medal and its 63 recipients since 1938. A ‘Whose Who’ of world gliding.
  • An indepth report on the 42nd Vintage Glider Club Rally, staged at Arnborg, Denmark, in August 2014. Francis Humblet writes about the Vintage Rally – the love of his life. One of the most interesting sailplanes was the Ka13 cut down to be an open cockpit two seater. An interesting project for any club looking for something different and inexpensive.
  • The latest new electric motor-glider is the ‘Song 120’. This single seater will set you back only €38,000 which makes it the cheapest on the market. Details in this issue.
  • Hungary is renown for the Rubik cube. The father of the cube’s creator, Ernő Rubik was Hungary’s most famous sailplane designer. We pen a story on the history of gliding in this country which is a remarkable location for cross country and wave soaring.
  • The future of gliding in China is discussed in this issue, which details the design work of an entrepreneur called Tian Yu who leads China's efforts in glider manufacturing. Tian Yu is manufacturing a two seat side by side electric motor glider. The report claims that there are only 117 licensed glider pilots in China but the number is expected to increase substantially over the next few years.
  • Accidents world wide since our last issue: 13 majors, no sailplanes involved in mid airs but two fatalities. All detailed in this issue.
  • Plus 35 other stories that will educate and inform.
  • We hope you will join us.

    JOHN ROAKE

    EDITOR.

    NEW (or RENEWING) SUBSCRIBERS CAN EASILY EFFECT A SUBSCRIPTION BY GOING TO OUR WEB PAGE - www.glidinginternational.com



THE SEPTEMBER 2014 ISSUE OF GLIDING INTERNATIONAL

  • Aldo Cernezzi's Perception of Räskälä
  • The Long Downwind Dream - Elke Fuglsang-Peters
  • The 13.5 Metre Class Saviour ?
  • Europe, Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow
  • Ritz Reports From Europe
  • German Research of New Zealand Skies
  • Centre Spread - Gigantic Wave Structures
  • G.P.S. Goes Under the Microscope
  • The Pilots Bill of Rights
  • Major Advances in Battery Technology
  • Remote Control Towers in Sweden
  • Propeller Blades Likely to Change Shape
  • Electric Winch Launching Now available For All
  • Graphene - the New Wonder Material
  • Bugs Are A Bugger - New Research
  • Medically Speaking - Intriguing New Statistics
  • Is It Good-Bye To Red Tape?
  • Update On The Instrument Scene
  • Perlan Project Will Really Fly
  • World Aviation News For Glider Pilots
  • The World's Leading Competition Pilots
  • Don't Call Them Drones 61 Things With Wings



We hope you will join us.



JOHN ROAKE


EDITOR.


THE JULY 2014 ISSUE OF GLIDING INTERNATIONAL

Our subscribers are writing to tell us they enjoy our new format. Thumbs up all round. It has been a great move. The July issue goes in the mail next week. Expect it in your mail box by June 27.

The issue covers over 60 new absorbing topics for yet another coffee table issue. The photos alone make it a ‘must have’ issue.

  • The authorative soaring journalist, Elk Fuglasang-Petersen (Germany) writes for Gliding international about her personal experiences in gliding with a Germany club and then comparing the experience with three years membership in an American club. Her observations are entertaining and informative. The differences are quite incredible.
  • Aldo Cernezzi has written about his evaluation of Schempp-Hirth’s Arcus E, the all electric fantastic two seater. Exceptionally well illustrated this report points out all the goods things about the Arcus E and about its limitations and costs.
  • Our staff reporter Rod Dew writes about ‘Mr Aerodrome’ - a story from the early 1900s detailing a catastrophic failure in trying to launch his glider a top a house boat in the Potomac river in USA. This Smithsonian director could have been as famous as the Wright Brothers as he had more answers to directional control than they had at the time. This is a fascinating hitherto hidden story of an exceptional pioneer. Did you know that Englishman Matthew Boulton in 1868 was the first to patent the aileron? Rudders, ailerons, and elevators had been invented long before the Wright’s efforts began. The English patent was unknown to the Wright Brothers who had the greatest difficulty getting a U.S. patent for their methodology.
  • The 2014 Grand Prix is over and the finals flown at Sisteron, France was an exciting event. Covered for Gliding International by Ritz du Luy, it was all the more interesting because a Frenchman stole the crown.
  • Schleicher’s new two seater, the ASG32 has flown and we captured the first test flight, flown from Poppenhausen, Germany. A sailplane of beauty!
  • The cost of towing aircraft gets more expensive by the hour. Two unrelated Australian’s have built home-built tugs that are expected to have performances almost equal to a Pawnee at less than half the price. A great review and a helpful paper for any club reviewing their towing costs. All this is followed by a review of the new Robin - Europe’s towing work horse. Great if the club has $.25 million to spend
  • We review Tom Knauff’s new book – a detailed collection of gliding accidents over the past 10 years. This is fascinating and instructive!
  • Two new, two seater electric motor gliders are flying. The Sun Seeker and the Sun Flyer (unrelated). There is no shortage of new projects being designed, worked on and projected to go into production.
  • This is frightening. US Customs officials are insisting on searches of motorgliders flown cross country. They have a misguided belief that they are ferrying drugs. A detailed story on one such search.
  • Research - A paper on how a university has been able to fly an aircraft by ‘thought processes only.’ The brain was connected to an auto pilot!
  • Plus 40 other stories that will educate and inform.


We hope you will join us.



JOHN ROAKE


EDITOR.


THE MAY 2014 ISSUE OF GLIDING INTERNATIONAL

Our new page size has generated literally hundreds of complimentary emails. Seems our subscribers are telling us it has been a great move. So here’s another spectacular issue that goes in the mail next week. You’ll have it by the week–end with any luck - postal authorities obliging.


We have found 60 or so new absorbing topics for this coffee table issue. The photos, as always, are incredible.


  • The authorative soaring journalist, Elk Fuglasang-Petersen (Geermany) writes for Gliding international about a special interview she had with Jim Payne, the pilot for the Perlan Project. Jim is the record holder as being the highest ever producer of On-Line Championships points.
  • 
 

  • Aldo Cernezzi has written about his evaluation of Schleicher’s ASH30 Mi two seater. Fantastically illustrated this well written report points out all the goods things about the ASH30 and the one bad - the rate of roll, 45 to 45.


  • New Zealand and the world has lost a founding father - Dick Georgeson, the holder of many world records, a Lilienthal medal holder, and the foremost explorer of wave flying. Dick died in April, aged 92. His cousin, Gavin Wills, the managing director of Glide Omarama writes about Dick’s extensive list of goals, medals and awards.


  • New discovery. Portable electric units, and Lithium batteries can be fully charged in 30 seconds. A major break through.


  • We catch up with a glider pilot (who speaks fluent English) in Kiev, Ukraine. His gliding club has been grounded and he writes about the political scene and how it is affecting his club


  • Everyone has heard about this season’s bush fires in Australia. Spectacular soaring conditions when the heat from the fires meets the cumulus clouds above. A good story (and photos) from a Danish pilot’s visit to Australia.
  • 


  • Soaring over Arabia - Three Stemme motor-gliders tour the country and with a large support team produce a story and photos that is remarkable. Maurice Weaver reports on the expedition “Wings over Arabia.”


  • A book full of decisions and changes to the Sporting Code were made at this year’s I.G.C. meeting in Italy. Full report.


  • Maria Szemplinska produces a photographic masterpiece up to her usual standard. (Humourous too)


  • Gliding International does a survey of over 80 clubs world wide as to the use of diesel-powered tugs. A big surprise in those results.
  • 


  • A step back in history to the 1500s and a look at how Leonardo da Vinci viewed the possibilities of flight. He was on the right track.


  • If a sailplane manufacturer announces a new feature today, it is highly likely that it was already standard equipment on a Eugen Hanle Libelle in the 1960s. The list is long and extremely interesting.


  • We up date readers on the latest in sailplane avionics and instruments. The issue is worth the cost just to get this information alone.


  • Time and gain we hear from the critics that “gliding is dead”.
  • Well don’t you believe it and we write and tell you why?


  • We have never seen so many bald headed enthusiasts in one place ever. Photos from the SSA convention (February/March) are illuminating.


  • There has been much talk about “head up” instruments for sailplanes recently. We have found that they were first out on the market for our sport in 1990, but were at least two years ahead of their time. The episode ended in the French courts with a substantial defamation claim.
  • 


  • An Australian pilot reviewed the figures we produced last issue and compared pilot numbers to the country’s population and then graded them from the top down. Surprise Surprise - to find out which is the Top Gliding Nation in the world. All set out in this issue.


  • Plus 40 other stories that will educate and inform.



We hope you will join us.



JOHN ROAKE


EDITOR.


THE MARCH 2014 ISSUE OF GLIDING INTERNATIONAL

To celebrate our seventh birthday we have produced our biggest issue yet. Seventy two pages in A4 – our new bigger size format.

The issue goes in the mail on February 26 and it has more stories than ever, with extensive news from around the soaring world.

  • 1. We report on the tragic fatality that was the subject of a big personal estate claim. One that the defendants settled out of court for over $1million. Hitherto not reported on in the gliding press.
  • 2. E Engineering, an aviation engineering company in Moscow is evaluating the question of re-opening the Blanik production line with a new 2014 model.
  • 3. The history of the Schempp-Hirth company goes back almost 80 years with an outstanding record of achievements. Gliding International looks at their scene and provides some previously unpublished photos. Great reading.
  • 4. The ASH31-Mi the (18m/21m) sailplane from Schleicher at Poppenhausen, Germany, comes in for a wealth of support from sailplane evaluator Aldo Cernezzi and his co-hort, Austrian Peter Hardmann. A sailplane that is recommended by the two.
  • 5. An English type contest has been picked up by a team in New Zealand and produced a new concept in championships. Good reading for the competition pilot.
  • 6. Our annual report on members, clubs, sailplanes and fatalities world wide for the calendar year 2013 has been completed and is a feature. Some surprises.
  • 7. A big story on the side by side two seater electric motor glider that was only eight months from initial concept to flying. A very creditable performance by a group of German students. A fascinating story that will appeal to every pilot.
  • 8. Imagine NASA playing with gliders? Well they are! The have got the idea that they can launch low level satellites using gliders on tow. They are playing with models and are serious about the concept. Another great read!
  • 9. Two stories – both completely difference but both engaged in conquering Everest. Sebastian Kawa and Klaus Ohlmann led two separate expeditions to Nepal and both achieved their goals, independent of the other.
  • 10. As a glider pilot you will have known about the ‘Diana’. Well its engineering principals have been captured by a new Polish manufacturer that has plans to have overwhelming success in the 13.5 metre class. The construction format seems impossible to believe. Like its finished weight! You are going to hear more about this family concern named ‘Peszke.’
  • 11. Boeing have decided on their final winglet design for the 737. How long before we see it on gliders? Reputed to increase performance by two percent.
  • 12. Found! The old Wright Brothers original factory in Dayton, Ohio which is now being restored for prosperity and will be part of a new aviation park.
  • 13. Bitterwasser has had an unbelievable 2013-14 season. We list the world records that were broken - especially by the female teams.
  • 14. We cover the appeal hearing by the FAI International Appeals Tribunal over the Netherlands complaint at the 2013 European championships.
  • 15. How about the USA team that are literally fighting to get car licenses accepted as a medical certificate for GA flying. This fight is getting heated.

- Plus 40 other stories that will educate and inform.

We hope you will join us.


THE JANUARY 2014 ISSUE OF GLIDING INTERNATIONAL

We are celebrating our seventh year of continuous publishing. To mark the occasion, the first 500 ‘first time’ new subscribers can secure an annual subscription for 50% of the normal rate. The offer is open until February 28 or when the total of 500 first time subscribers has been reached. (New subscribers use our web site to enrol).

The January issue goes in the mail on December 27. It marks the introduction of a magazine that is 17.5% bigger in size which makes for some exciting new layouts. The spread of news comes from every corner of the planet.

  • 1. THE LEAD STORY is about the JS-1 and the new Jonkers factory in South Africa - what a success story it is. Our journalists show you inside the purpose built factory whilst our flying team put the JS-1 through its paces and report on its performance. It is quite amazing. The story and photos cover 12 pages which is about the biggest single topic story we have every published. Did you know that Jonkers will produce JS-1 number 70 during 2014 - an envy of many manufacturers.
  • 2. Everyone wants a 1000 km award. But we are first to acknowledge that it is not easy. We have found the ideal site – a 1000 km ridge in a civilized location – easy to get to with a substantial club on site. Almost suitable year round. Read about it in the January issue.
  • 3. Satellite thermal forecasting is the new fad and we show how it is being done for the African continent. The success rate is phenomenal.
  • 4. There are few gliding magazines we don’t read to keep up with the world scene. We have selected the ‘2013 Gliding Story of the Year’ for the best laugh you have had in months. It is about a real fun event!
  • 5. Head up Display for $149.95 for a Sailplane Instrument display on your canopy! We have been following this scene for several years and can now report that it is certainly more possible now than at any previous time. It is coming for sure and our prediction is that we will see it become commonplace within two years. See the full story.
  • 6. Some unique photos included in this issue. A nine glider launch behind a single agricultural spreading tug - and a Schleicher KA8 fitted with two Rolls Royce turbine jets.
  • 7. We spend four or five minutes of your time introducing Karl Striedieck to our massive readership.
  • 8. Zeoform is a new moulded material that has a big future in aviation. Just patented in Australia it could revolutionize future moulded aircraft.
  • 9. First time story release. The powered sailplane main wheel that you can control by a garage door remote while holding the wing tip. It is coming during 2014. Read the story!
  • 10. A nature story for glider pilots. The symbol of the USA soaring (the Bald Eagle) has been saved from extinction. A fascinating story.
  • 11. The gliding time – from release at 9500 ft to landing - exactly one minute. Maybe NASSA might have to do better than this with their new re-entry glider.
  • 12. There has been much press recently about the flying ability of airline pilots when they have to perform hands-on control in desperate situations. The training captain for Easy-Jet, has said every airline pilot should take a course in gliding. This is going to be big. We cover the story is some extensive detail.
  • 13. General aviation sports pilot numbers have fallen by 20 percent ion the past 10 years. More in the magazine.
  • 14. An update on regulatory changes and the issues involved and prevailing in Europe.
  • 15. New sailplane instruments that will be released first in 2014. Photos and brief run down on what’s coming.
  • 16. The German glider (made by university students) out of 70 sq metres of paper and 700 tubes of glue. Best described as ‘Incredible.’ In flight photograph!
  • 17. How inexpensively it is to re-life your worn out tired hangar doors.
  • 18. Did you realise that Polish sailplane parts have a built in 23 per cent export tax? No wonder parts from Poland are so expensive. Details in the January issue.
  • 19. It’s a great issue – plenty of stories for every pilot regardless of how far advanced you are.

- Plus 40 other stories that will educate and inform.

We hope you will join us.


THE NOVEMBER 2013 ISSUE OF GLIDING INTERNATIONAL

Our November 2013 issue fulfils our promise of producing something different. And it is different - covering a multitude of unusual gliding topics.

  • 1. It is hard to imagine a benefactor donating $2.8 million in hard cash to set up a new soaring club with a specific goal. Two new sailplanes, a new hangar, two tugs, a simulator, and live in accommodation is but a few of the assets donated. An extremely interesting article about this West Australian venture.
  • 2. There has to be a reason why three of the world’s bigger airforces have purchased over 20 DG1001 two seater sailplanes. (45:1) A complete review of this trainer/competition sailplane by Aldo Cernezzi will help readers understand why this sailplane is the referred two seater for training and for clubs.
  • 3. An interview with Bernd Dolba, one of Germany’s leading soaring pilots over his expeditions to Morocco. There have now been five annual camps at Quarzazate (central Morocco) where 18,000 ft cloud bases are an every day occurrence. There is room for you at the 2014 camp next May/June.
  • 4. Sebastian Kawa is organising an expedition to Nepal, and there are vacancies for additional pilots to join the Polish team. Their plan is to over-fly Mount Everest. The best month is December. Their Schleicher ASW25 is already in transit to their base camp at Pokhara, the second largest city of Nepal. Full details in this issue.
  • 5. The Safety Captain of Easyjet, Sarah Kelman, has broken her silence about the standard of manual flying of jet pilots. A world record holder in gliding, she advocates that every Jet pilot should take a basic recovery training session in gliders. Sarah should know what she is talking about. She holds several gliding world records and is a past world championship winner. Read the full story in the November issue that is being mailed on October 25.
  • 6. Gliding International’s standard page size is to increase with our next issued with 17.7% more text space, giving us more room to more adequately print those amazing photos from Maria Szemplinska.
  • 7. Germany’s government research centre (D.L.R.) is found a way of recognising clear-air turbulence which is going to be another added safety feature for glider pilots.
  • 8. The 41st Vintage Glider Club rally was recently held at Lasham, England. The club’s new hangar that will eventually become a museum, was the centre of the event. Full report and photo coverage in this issue.
  • 9. The sailplane manufacturers are starting to display more interest in the new 13.5 metre class. We continue the series with another contender who is producing a very marketable sailplane that needs further investigation.
  • 10. We have another look at new instruments and Paul Remde tells you what is coming in 2014 and what you need to update what you already have.
  • 11. We have set up a global network to report on major sailplane accidents. There were 24 major accidents (World wide) in August and September. We tell you where they were, the cause, the fatalities/injuries/ the sailplane make and model. We even caught up on one major in China, eight in France, three in Italy and two in Germany, two in Poland and two in Austria.
  • 12. Some 650 children (aged 6 -12) were surveyed in the United Kingdom about what they want to be when they grow up. Soccer players headed the list but the results are illuminating. We tell you where pilots were on the list.
  • 13. The IGC Sporting Code debate is hotting up and we have been to some lengths to show you in graphic form the global distribution of awards and records. You are going to be amazed when you see the graphs and the commentary.
  • 14. Pipistrel have released their motor glider which is a ‘four in one’ aircraft. Details in this issue
  • 15. We talk about the glider that has been labelled the “Flying Coffin”.
  • 16. Now your club can fill your own aviation oxygen bottles. A new kit is now on the market to decant your own oxygen bottles. Full details with photos.

- Plus 40 other stories that will educate and inform.

We hope you will join us.


THE SEPTEMBER 2013 ISSUE OF GLIDING INTERNATIONAL

  • 1. A big issue on Dynamic Soaring and a run down on the mammoth amount of money being spent on this source of lift by commercial interests.
  • 2. Did you know that Glider pilots in Germany do not need to have transponders. A big revelation on European airspace and the near miss by a Ryanair 737. There are more near misses than commonly reported.

  • 3. The new world distance speed record flown in Patagonia and another battle with the Argentinean customs department. A ground speed record of 448 kph.
  • 4. Weather forecasting the new way - direct to your iphone - as you want it when you want it. It will tell you when the thermal activity meets your criteria. Stay in bed and wait for it to call!

  • 5. Aldo Cernezzi test flies the first pro-type of the first batch of 13.5 metre sailplanes everyone is waiting for. It comes from Lithuania and Aldo was invited to fly Number One of the new model and he reports back in detail.

  • 6. Learn where gliding has something in common with wire walking - how and why!

  • 7. Windward Performance release details of their highly spec’d JetHawk. Two under construction for early delivery. NO jet sailplane comes anywhere near the performance these boys are producing.
  • 8. Maria Szemplinska produces four exceptional new photographs for this special issue. Gold is the colour theme!

  • 9. A new finance scheme being offered to finance aircraft – Maybe you can afford a glider for yourself sooner than you think!

  • 10. From Walter Binder comes the details of his two seat EB29
11. Ritz rounds up the news from Europe with a lot of details you are yet to hear about.
  • 12. The Bad Elf GPS Pro has been designed specifically for pilots, based on feedback research. Reasonably price, when combined with your ipad/iphone it does everything a glider pilot would ever want.

  • 13. July was a not good month accident wise in Europe. Some spectacular photos.

  • 14. With a new C.O., Stemme has relaunched itself at Oshkosh offering some new innovations.

  • 15. The average age of light aircraft in the USA including gliders is now 40. A few problems in this department.

  • 16. A new soap opera being filmed in the United Kingdom revolving around a glider. Will be on your TV soon.

  • 17. A Japanese pilot has produced a flying wing glider with a jet engine. Rather him than us flying this one!

  • 18. Fuel cells the new source of power for your sailplane gizmos. Read about the first one

  • 19. And about 50 news breaks for every gliding enthusiast.

- Plus 40 other stories that will educate and inform.

We hope you will join us.


THE JULY 2013 ISSUE OF GLIDING INTERNATIONAL

Our July issue IS one of our very best and includes:

  • A review of seven new two seater sailplanes not previously announced and now being produced and marketed.
  • A six page evaluation of the Schempp-Hirth Arcus sailplane with a test flight report from the expert, Aldo Cernezzi.
  • An in depth report on Aero 2013 sailplane Exposition at Friedrichshafen, Germany. The biggest yet.
  • The “Crossover” two seater motor-glider is the first to be able adjust wingspan in flight. This is record breaking news.
  • Did you know that there was $12.68 million dollars worth of sailplanes flying at the Uvalde worlds? See for yourself!
  • New plan to provide finance to secure your own sailplane.
  • Extremely interesting flight story about a Rookie pilot and his almost successful 1000 km flight in a JS-1. Could be you!
  • Our country of interest this issue is Greece and boy will the conditions there surprise you.
  • See the photo of the first seaplane glider. It is a ‘launched by launch’ glider.
  • A new feature “Lets Chat”. The month’s most interesting stories recorded on a gliding chat frequencies. This time three pilots discuss stall recovery in sailplanes as opposed to the Air France Flight 447 disaster.
  • How 18 different countries treat a situation on how they manage the acquisition of two gliders. Good humour.
  • Details of the 25 story high monument to the Wright Brothers with a model of their sailplane perched on top. The model in stainless steel is to have a 140 ft wing span.
  • Details of the first two-seat trainer that has an electric motor driving a nose cone propeller. Unit powered by a fixed petrol motor in the fuselage that has a built-in generator. The most sensible motor glider yet!
  • Report on the 25th birthday of the European Air Sport’s management. They are making more progress on sensible administration, aided by the European Aviation Safety Authority. The group is working collectively and in harmony.
  • And a story about the colliery worker from Wales and the building of a replica of a sailplane that was built before the Wright Brothers.
  • Changes you can expect starting next year with the GPS service you have come to accept. Not long now before your present equipment could be out of date and need replacing.
  • An eight page report on the latest in sailplane instrumentation. Updated to the very latest available.
  • Update report from Ritz exclusively for Gliding International. She writes about this season’s winners (and losers) in Europe.
  • AND fifty-one paragraph briefs on news for glider pilots from every corner of the globe.

Our best issue yet!

We hope you will join us.


THE MAY 2013 ISSUE OF GLIDING INTERNATIONAL

The May 2013 another 64 page issue that has a spread of news and photos from around the planet. Another issue with some great reading plus a wealth of new press release stories for soaring pilots wherever you are. Just some of the stories include:

  • 1. The May issue is special, printed on art paper to better re-produce the large number of sailplane air to air photos. Gavin Wills from Omarama has spent a small fortune on the widest ever ranging photo shoot and we have selected the best for subscribers to frame if they so want to.
  • 2. Glide Omarama’s fame has spread to all four corners of the globe. This mountain flying adventure operation is now the biggest of its type in the world and Gliding Journalist, Rod Dew, writes in detail about its founder Gavin Wills, his ideals, his future plans and what he offers first time uninitiatd mountain soarers.
  • 3. Added to all the above is a story on the Wills Dynasty, that started with Philip in 1936. The family has a remarkable history and been at the top of the gliding scene for seventy-seven years. You will no doubt recall these Wills names: Philip, Justin, Chris, Mathew, Gavin, Lucy and George. What a gliding family!
  • 4. Aldo Cernezzi provides air and ground reports on the Antares series of sailplanes. Few realize that the Antares is the first and only electric sailplane to be certified by aviation authorities. This is his third in depth report on a new sailplane and is all the more important as he owns an Antares himself. He writes with confidence about this 50:1 unique electric sailplane. A comprehensive educational eight page report.
  • 5. The A0S-71 is stirring up considerable interest. The issue carries a well illustrated report on this new training side by side two seater sailplane from Poland. Kept under covers until it was first flown in February, this remarkable new 21st century trainer is quoted as being a ‘flying experimental laboratory’ project for two Polish Universities. The lines are very gracious. The seating positions are something new for a trainer. A decision to go into production has yet to be made.
  • 6. Ritz reports on the terrible European past winter and spring and the glorious summers being enjoyed by southern hemisphere nations. As usual a great summary on the world gliding scene.
  • 7. John Roake writes about a unique fund raising campaign he once organised. A successful way to pay for any new sailplane. This is worth a read, not only for the idea itself but the humour built in. A good laugh!
  • 8. Lithium ion batteries are again under the microscope. The results of Boeing’s research is detailed and a likely solution to the problem has been forthcoming. We have done some research following the grounding of the Dreamliners to tell you about their safety or otherwise. We reproduce photos of the installation of Lithium batteries in the Antares sailplane which will surprise many.
  • 9. Tree and gliders don’t mix - we show what happens when a self launching ASW26 ends 20 metres up a tree. Whoops! Horrible to see!
  • 10. And there is the story about the sailplane wheel brake that guarantees to better your existing brake by 50%
  • 11. Why do people stop gliding? An essay that tries to explain why and how. Anyone can use it to self examine those about to leave the sport.

In depth report on I.G.C.’s annual meeting in Holland in March.

We hope you will join us.

PLUS A MULTITUDE OF OTHER INTERNATIONAL STORIES THAT PROVIDE GREAT READING.


THE MARCH - APRIL 2013 ISSUE OF GLIDING INTERNATIONAL

  • We print an interview with Bogimil Bereś – the creator of the ‘Diana.’ Few would even know his name, but he reveals his background, the tortuous path the production of the Diana has taken, it’s future and how he is battling to get it type rated. AND he has let slip that he has already done some design work on a two seat 22 metre Diana which will be a ‘turn up’ for the sailplane manufacturing industry. He believes he already has a backer. He lets us into some back ground on what goes on in the Polish sailplane manufacturing industry. This is one of the best stories we have ever printed.
  • Aldo Cernezzi reports in this issue on the Silent Electro - his second in depth report on a new sailplanes. This sailplane has an electric motor in the nose capable of self launching and cruising. Aldo gives it a ‘thumbs up’. A real fun 40:1 sailplane at an acceptable price for the sheer enthusiast, who doesn’t give a fig about competitions. A comprehensive educational report.
  • Gliding fatalities world wide, are up 26 Percent in 2012. Our annual report of gliding statistics (for 2012) shows that the sport has also lost its greatest number yet of flying members during the year under review. An absolute myriad of information for everyone associated with the sport, especially I.G.C. delegates.
  • Ritz reports on the 32nd World Gliding Championships held at Chaves, Argentina. Full scoring report. Ritz gives a broad report on the three classes and tells it as it happened.
  • Maria Szemplinska produces some original new photographs for soaring pilots to ‘ogle’ over. She is a world leader in gliding photography
  • NASA joins two sailplanes together with a new concept for launching rockets. See what they have done to two Ventus’.
  • Lithium ion batteries are under the microscope. We have done some research following the grounding of the Dreamliners to tell you just how or how not they are in regard to safety. We reproduce photos of the of Lithium batteries in the Antares sailplane which will surprise many.
  • Can you imagine a safety helmet made of cardboard? We couldn’t but they now exist! It opens up all sorts of possibilities. More in this issue.
  • And there is the story about the soaring pilot who over flew a power plant to only spend a day and half in prison without being charged. It could happen to you!
  • The European Aviation Safety Agency has taken a complete review of the laws they have previously wanted to enforce. What an about turn! A message here for your CAA to take a leaf out of their new book.
  • And we introduce a new gadget that will be an absolute must for competition pilots wanting to load their sailplane up with ballast. You would think it was just made for competition pilots alone.

We hope you will join us.


THE DECEMBER - JAN 2013 ISSUE OF GLIDING INTERNATIONAL

The January 2013 issue goes in the mail on December 18. Another 64 page issue that has a spread of news and photos from around the planet. Another issue with some great reading plus a wealth of new press release stories for soaring pilots wherever you are. Stories include:

  • 1. We have a replacement for the late Jochen Ewald. Aldo Cernezzi fills Jochen’s place on the world gliding scene with great expertise.
  • 2. Gliding International columnist Francis Humblet has been in Lithuania and reports on the Lak factory. Not a pretty scene there.
  • 3 We have another look at the ‘Morning Glory’ with some great new photography. The ‘Morning Glory’ is a must for all glider pilots.
  • 4. A first for any gliding publication. Gliding International has a one on one interview with Sebastian Kawa!
  • 5. Our expert on sailplane instruments reports on all the new goodies that are to be available in 2013.
  • 6. Bet you didn’t know Flarm employs over 40 staff now and is the gliding success story of the decade. Read about the start of this company.
  • 7. Ritz again reports from Europe and tells us about the multitude of 1000 km triangles being flown world wide.
  • 8. Maria Szemplinska produces some original new photographs for soaring pilots to ‘ogle’ over.
  • 9. South African manufacturer Jonker sailplanes details just how they fitted out a test sailplane to produce induced flutter and how to control it.
  • 10. The history of Windward Performance makes great reading, how it all came about.
  • 11. Giorgio Galetto, a world top Italian soaring pilot had a disastrous accident in the French Alps earlier in 2012.
  • 12. A ‘do all – provide everything’ glass instrument that needs no installing is amongst some of the latest instruments to reach the 2013 market.
  • 13. At last - a simple easily applied new Nasal Spray for motion sickness. NASA has got into the act on finding a solution to this problem.
  • 14. Details on a new on-line course to improve your radio transmission abilities.
  • 15. Big development strides in having drones fly with collision-avoidance technologies. The answer to this thorny problem is very near.
  • 16. The British Gliding Association has reduced the minimum age for first solos to 14.
  • 17. FAA reports that fatal accidents in sporting aviation have increased by 25% over the pat 10 years whilst accident numbers are basically static.

THE NOVEMBER - DEC 2012 ISSUE OF GLIDING INTERNATIONAL

  • 1. We have a retrospective look at Uvalde after it is all over. Question: Does this justify the difference in cost between these two classes? There was only 0.8% difference between the Open and the 18 m. Think about that before ordering a new Open Class ship.
  • 2. Neil Alden Armstrong was not only an American astronaut, but an exceptional glider pilot too.
  • 3 Mid-airs are on the increase. A synopsis of all the research that has gone on over the past 20 years and the endeavours made to find a better way of making sailplanes more conspicuous.
  • 4. There is a new way of eliminating your club’s timekeeper. Dittolog, an Australian project that can be self-funding is an answer and we go to some lengths to give you an insight into how it would work at your club.
  • 5. Sebastian Kawa, the world’s number one pilot has written a book entitled ‘Sky full of heat”.
  • 6. The Unflapped and the Club Class Worlds is a little over two months away in Argentina. Adolfo Gonzales Chaves is located on the ‘Pampas’. We provide details on the flying conditions, which is unlike anything any European has ever experienced.
  • 7. Protecting airspace - We provide details of the millions of dollars being spent by drone interests lobbying for control of airspace. Changes are closer than you might think and money no object.
  • 8. Schleicher Sailplanes of Poppenhausen are having a remarkable year. An update on their production and competition results.
  • 9. Maria Szemplinska, our very talented photographer has produced some extra special photographs for this issue.
  • 10. A new concept in a training two seater - this time from Italy. The Flyvolt G208 concept has some potential.
  • 11. Gliding is the answer, but what is the question? The European Gliding Union has produced a paper on retaining members.
  • 12. Takikawa in northern Japan is the biggest gliding centre in the country. The city is called the ‘City of Gliding.’ They have just taken over the Honda vintage glider collection adding 12 more gliders to their existing fleet of 32. An interesting project.
  • 13. The melting arctic ice is the reason for Europe’s unpredictable and terrible summers. And they are not going to get much if any better. Droughts, heat waves and flooding are on the agenda for 2013. World meteorologists report.
  • 14. There is a distinct likelihood that wooden spars could return to new sailplanes. The US Forest products laboratory branch of the US Forest Service has discovered a means of using waste wood products to make material called CNC (cellulose nanocrystals) that is infinitely stronger and twice as light as Kevlar. (And 100 times cheaper).
  • 15. Heard of ‘Naviter’ - Of course you have – We give an insight into how the company was formed, details on the two proprietors and what these geniuses have up their sleeve and likely in the near future.
  • 16. Ritz again reports from Europe and the end of the 2012 OLC season.
  • 17. FAI has created FAME (FAI Airsports Marketing and Events), which is a new marketing company for airsport disciplines.
  • 18. Details on a Gigantic leap forward in Lithium-ion batteries.
  • 19. The story about Boris Popov who has saved 246 pilot lives with his ballistic recovery system. How his dream became a reality.
  • 20. Gavin Wills (of Omarama fame) writes about his pet source of lift – mountain thermals.
  • 21. Chile declares that Santiago is the best soaring site on the Andes. They are staging another Grand Prix there in 2013. They want you to come.

THE SEPTEMBER - OCT 2012 ISSUE OF GLIDING INTERNATIONAL

Another 72 page issue that has a spread of news and photos from the Worlds in Uvalde complete with the scores in a new format.

This, plus a wealth of news for soaring pilots from around the world. Stories include:

  • 1. An editorial review that claims that the IGC is ignoring 97% of the world membership. Our exhilarating sport is in decline.
  • 2. More opposition for German manufacturers. Windward steps up a gear or two with the announcement of a new two seat trainer and a 22 metre open class single seater.
  • 3. A chart showing preferences by competitors, and the gliders flown in World championships in 2010 and 2012.
  • 4. A new On-Line-Competition - An alternative to O.L.C.
  • 5. Mid-air in Finland. Both with Flarms. Official accident report and Flarms response.
  • 6. A new initiative in attracting youth and others to gliding
  • 7. Ever heard of Mount Cook? The 12,000 foot playground many have yet to experience.
  • 8. Jonkers (Sth Africa) caught everyone by surprise in producing a 22 metre sailplane for the Uvalde Worlds. Their world championship results included.
  • 9. Weather balloons no longer a necessity for weather forecasters. New technology unveiled at the Uvalde Worlds
  • 10. You would think the watch was designed by a glider pilot. Everything you want to soar. This is new from Garmin.
  • 11. Heard of Rudolph Kaiser – the Schleicher designer? All about the ASK14 biennial reunion.
  • 12. New GPS from Korea. Monitors the US, Russian and European satellites, providing the most accurate positioning yet produced.
  • 13. The Father's Day gliding accident that cost three lives.
  • 14. Ely versus Parowan - The gliding sites that most North Americans aspire to fly at.
  • 15. An attempt to try and interest the Olympics in putting gliding back on the list of acceptable sports.
  • 16. We pay tribute to Dick Butler and his Concordia. What a remarkable sailplane he has produced and flown in the Worlds.
  • 17. Report from Farnborough 2012 and new winglet designs.
  • 18. Coming to a cockpit near you - Touch screen technology
  • 19. Where in hell has it gone now? A forthcoming solution for tow pilots to show whether the glider being towed is in position. Will be like having a rear vision camera for towpilots.
  • 20. Old age is a terrible thing. Assisting the infirmed to get in and out of the cockpit. There is gliding for the over seventies.
  • 21. A gliding contest in 1938 complete with photos. Very revealing.
  • 22. The Apis Jet. The sailplane with the permanently inbuilt jet sustainer - no longer necessary to raise your motor from the fuselage.
  • 23. The story on the National Soaring Museum – at Harris Hill.
  • 24. The Wright Brothers Flyer – A report on actually flying it.
  • 25. From the USA – something for every nation to follow. The Pilot's Bill of rights.
  • 26. Glider pilots and skin cancer. A wake-up call.
  • 27. The Argentinean 2013 - World Championships - Have solved their customs problems. No longer a worry for competitors.
  • 28. Gliding, Soaring or Suicide? Not suggested you follow.

THE JULY - AUG 2012 ISSUE OF GLIDING INTERNATIONAL

In the July issue is another wealth of news for soaring pilots from around the world. Stories include:

  • 1. Jonkers designer, Johannes J Bosman looks into the future and enumerates how he plans to lift the performance of their sailplanes.
  • 2. Patagonia at its very worst, but an interesting report on soaring the Andes waves full of volcanic eruption dust from the Chilean volcano.
  • 3. The French expedition to Patagonia this year experienced terribly corrupt customs officials and paid ‘through the nose’.
  • 4. The story about the Solvenian pilot that flew his Pipistrel motor glider round the world in 2.5 months.
  • 5. Debate on fuels and motors for tugs. The future of Avgas looks decidedly unsustainable.
  • 6. Peace seeming to be declared between the European Aviation Safety Authority and Europe Airsports on regimentation.
  • 7. A cheap solution has been found to effectively silence noisy tugs and motorgliders.
  • 8. How Red Bull fixed their Austrian grounded Blaniks.
  • 9. ‘On a Wing and A prayer’ One of the most hair raising cross country flights ever achieved. A 1980 story re-lifed.
  • 10. A solo effort - An Australian home builder will complete from scratch, the building of a 1930’s gulled winged Minemoa.
  • 11. Germany looks into insect airworthiness to find improved gliding performances.
  • 12. New research on 80% of the worlds soaring population. Fatality rates as a percentage of pilots numbers. This is frightening!
  • 13. Another chart on which countries are losing the most members.
  • 14. Story on the man who made his own self-launcher out of a SparrowHawk.
  • 15. The ‘Freedom of information act’ is used to extract the true position on how many UAV’s are flying and where. You’ll be amazed!
  • 16. United Kingdom to open a gliding museum. Their first!
  • 17. Clubs with just $600 can now afford to have their own mapping, circuit planning/ turn point identification device.
  • 18. IBM now seriously into battery research and spending millions.
  • 19. Research shows that windfarms will produce thermals later in the day than any other likely generator.
  • 20. Garmin has now made/sold over 100 million GPS devices.
  • 21. FAI creates a special marketing company and IGC president elected to the board.
  • 22. The world’s top competition pilot has a very nasty accident and in hospital recovering. Unlikely to fly again this season.
  • 23. Story on the $600,000 one off hot ship that broke up in mid-air last month.
  • 24. Chart on competition shows participation declines.
  • 25. The success of the Online Competition. May 12/13 - 3,833 flights logged world wide.

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